2008 University Press Books

 

Selected for Public and Secondary School Libraries

 

AAUP Home | Bibliography Home | Bibliography Contents

 

800-899 Literature and Rhetoric


800-819 American Literature

820-829 British Literature

       

890-899 Literature of Other Languages

       
   

800-819 American Literature


803

Mikics, David

A New Handbook of Literary Terms

368 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, index, $35.00 cloth, CIP included

April 2007

Yale University Press

Lively and learned, this up-to-date guide to literary words and concepts is an essential volume for every student and reader of literature, particularly for its clarification of the often confusing terrain of literary theory today. “Mikics’s New Handbook is superbly generous...an exuberant introduction to all of Western literature and criticism.”—Harold Bloom. “Offering more commentary than that found in standard literary dictionaries, this portable, easily read, abridged literary dictionary restricts its selections to those terms that Mikics believes are ‘crucial’ for students to know...Recommended for public and academic libraries.”—Library Journal

LC 2006037905, ISBN 978-0-300-10636-7

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


808.066

Larson, Thomas

The Memoir and the Memoirist: Reading and Writing Personal Narrative

225 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $32.95 cloth, $16.95 paper, CIP included

June 2007

Ohio University Press/ Swallow Press

For both the interested reader of memoir and the writer wrestling with the craft, The Memoir and the Memoirist provides guidance and insight into the many facets of this provocative and popular art form. “This thoughtfully reasoned and lucidly written book delves further into the dynamics of the new memoir than anything I know of, and is sure to spark discussion, help guide would-be practitioners, and bring much-needed illumination to a vexed subject.”—Phillip Lopate, editor of The Art of the Personal Essay

LC 2007005958, ISBN 978-0-8040-1100-6 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8040-1101-3 (p.)

AASL: O/HS, P

PLA: G


808.8

Popescu, Lucy and Carole Seymour-Jones

Writers Under Siege: Voices of Freedom From Around the World

304 pp., 6” x 9”, $65.00 cloth, $18.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

New York University Press

Collected here are fifty contributions by writers who have paid dearly for the privilege of writing. Some have been tortured; some have been killed. All understand the cost of speaking up and speaking out. This book was prepared by PEN, which is both the world’s oldest human rights organization and the oldest international literary organization. It commemorates PEN’s eighty-fifth anniversary and celebrates PEN’s work by giving voice to persecuted writers from around the globe. The contributors come from more than twenty countries, from Belarus to Zimbabwe.

LC 2007014892, ISBN 978-0-8147-6742-9 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8147-6743-6 (p.)

AASL: O/HS

PLA: O


809

Cook, Richard M.

Alfred Kazin: A Biography

464 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, 20 b&w illus. (in insert), bibliog., index, $35.00 cloth, CIP included

December 2007

Yale University Press

The first biography of Alfred Kazin, the son of barely literate Jewish immigrants, who rose from near poverty to become a dominant figure in literary criticism, as well as one of America’s last great men of letters. Richard M. Cook provides the first complete portrait of Kazin, his troubled personal life, his relationships with such figures as Lionel Trilling and Hannah Arendt, and his prodigious contributions as a public intellectual. “A thorough, balanced, and very thoughtful life of one of twentieth-century America’s premier critics and writers.”—Sean Wilentz, Princeton University. “A splendid book.”—Denis Donoghue, author of The American Classics and Speaking of Beauty.

LC 2007019874, ISBN 978-0-300-11505-5

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


809.3

Pruch, Jeff (Editor)

Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction

384 pp., 6 3/10” x 9 1/4”, $29.95 cloth, CIP included

May 2007

Oxford University Press

The first historical dictionary devoted to science fiction, Brave New Words: The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction shows exactly how science-fictional words and their associated concepts have developed over time, with full citations and bibliographic information. It’s a window on a whole genre of literature through the words invented and passed along by the genre’s most talented writers. In addition, it shows how many words we consider everyday vocabulary—words like “spacesuit,” “blast off,” and “robot”—had their roots in imaginative literature, and not in hard science.

LC 2006037280, ISBN 978-0-19530567-8

AASL: S/HS, P

PLA: G


810.809

Waldron, Karen A., Janice H. Brazil, and Laura M. Labatt (Editors)

Risk, Courage, and Women: Contemporary Voices in Prose and Poetry

384 pp., 6” x 9”, notes, $34.95 cloth, $19.95 paper, CIP included

August 2007

The University of North Texas Press

This unique collection of narratives, essays, and poems includes an original interview with Maya Angelou and pieces by Naomi Shihab Nye, Pat Mora, Rosemary Catacalos, and many others. Each work relates how women have demonstrated courage by taking a risk that has changed their lives—courage as a result of thoughtful choices demonstrating integrity and self-awareness. Each section opens with a description of its organization and the significance of individual pieces. Themes include sustenance for living, faith in the unknown, the courage of choice, the seams of our lives, and crossing borders.

LC 2007005473, ISBN 978-1-57441-233-8 (c.), ISBN 978-1-57441-234-5 (p.)

AASL: O/HS

PLA: O


810.9

von Flotow, Luise and Reingard M. Nischik (Editors)

Translating Canada (Perspectives in Translation)

352 pp., 6” x 9”, index, $40.00 paper, CIP included

October 2007

University of Ottawa Press

Focusing on German translations of Canadian literature, drama, criticism and film, this pioneering volume looks at the surprising role that translation plays in exporting Canadian culture. Translating Canada considers the motivations of translators who have transformed Canadian cultural material for a German audience and the reception by German reviewers of these works. Taking as its examples a wide variety of Canadian writing—novels and poetry, plays and children’s literature, literary and social criticism—the book maps for its readers a number of significant, though frequently unsuspected, roles that translation assumes in the intercultural negotiation of national images and values.

C2007-905433-1, ISBN 978-0-7766-0661-3

AASL: RS/P


810.936

Fiamengo, Janice (Editor)

Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination

366 pp., 6” x 9”, 19 color and 12 b&w illus., photos, index, $45.00 paper, CIP included

July 2007

University of Ottawa Press

Other Selves begins with the premise, first suggested by Margaret Atwood in The Animals in That Country (1968), that animals have occupied a peculiarly central position in the Canadian imagination. In this volume, fifteen scholars discuss major authors and issues in Canadian animal literature, exploring how and what animals have meant in all genres and periods of Canadian writing.

C2007-901497-6, ISBN 978-0-7766-0645-3

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: RS


811

Smith, RT

Outlaw Style: Poems

110 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $16.00 paper, CIP included

November 2007

The University of Arkansas Press

Outlaw Style is a collection of narrative and lyric poems, many of them in the tradition of Robert Browning’s dramatic monologues. While gothic imagery, humor, and nineteenth-century diction and reference alternate and interweave, the four thematic currents that converge in the collection are music, race, spirituality, and the impact of monstrosity on somewhat innocent bystanders.

LC 2007023579, ISBN 978-1-55728-853-0

AASL: RG/HS

PLA: G


811

Tobin, Daniel

The Book of Irish American Poetry: From the Eighteenth Century to the Present

976 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, index, $65.00 cloth, CIP included

January 2007

University of Notre Dame Press

The first major anthology of Irish-American poetry, drawing together the best and most representative poetry by Irish Americans, and about Irish America, from the past three hundred years. “...if the purpose of a good poetry anthology is to introduce readers to unfamiliar writers and reacquaint them with neglected masters, this one must be judged a raging success. Tobin does provide a meaningfully convivial context in which to engage, in close proximity, the work of Galway Kinnell, Billy Collins, and Paul Muldoon. They’re good company, and there’s plenty more where that came from.”—Booklist

LC 2006032384, ISBN 978-0-268-04230-1

AASL: O/HS

PLA: G


811.4

Abbott, Craig

Forging Fame: The Strange Career of Scharmel Iris

204 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, 9 b&w photos, bibliog., index, $34.00 cloth, CIP included

August 2007

Northern Illinois University Press

Poet, plagiarist, imposter, and forger, Iris engaged in a lifelong campaign of self-promotion that linked him to a constellation of leading writers and public figures. With energy and persistence, this minor Chicago poet insinuated himself among the great and famous and simulated a life of literary stardom. Examining Iris’s grandiose fantasy, Abbott exposes the poet’s forgery, plagiarism, and imposture while granting Iris the attention he haplessly courted all his life. “Jaw-dropping in places, Abbott’s [book] entertains beyond a constant escalation of Iris’s audacity and narcissism. There is also much wit.”—The Chronicle of Higher Education

LC 2007012441, ISBN 978-0-875-80376-0

AASL: S/HS, P


811.54

Aragón, Francisco

The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry

272 pp., 6” x 9”, $17.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

The University of Arizona Press

This is the most significant collection of emerging Latino poets to be published in the twenty-first century. Included here are 25 of today’s most significant poets, many of whom will be major poets of tomorrow. Their work pays homage to their Latino roots but is clearly grounded in the contemporary world. “...Whether inspired by family, love, despair, poems by Rilke, or a painting by Jose Clemente Orozco, the poets gathered here are involved in the infinite possibilities of language.”—Booklist

LC 2006028665, ISBN 978-0-8165-2493-8

AASL: O/HS

PLA: G


811.54

Bartlett, Brian and Don Domanski

Earthly Pages: The Poetry of Don Domanski

60 pp., 6” x 9”, $14.95 paper, CIP included

August 2007

Wilfrid Laurier University Press

With The Cape Breton Book of the Dead, Don Domanski emerged as a remarkable new voice in Canadian poetry, combining formal conciseness with broad cosmic allusions, constant surprise with brooding atmospherics, and innovative syntax with delicate phrasings. In subsequent collections, Domanski’s poetry has deepened and expanded, with longer lines and more complex structures that journey into the far reaches of metaphor. Now, with Earthly Pages: The Poetry of Don Domanski, the long-awaited first selection from his books, readers have a chance to experience the full range of his work in one volume.

ISBN 978-1-55458-008-8

AASL: RS/P

PLA: RS


811.54

Campo, Rafael

The Enemy

112 pp., 6” x 9”, $59.95 cloth, $17.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

Duke University Press

In his fifth collection of poetry, the physician and award-winning writer Rafael Campo considers what it means to be the enemy in America today. He writes of a country endlessly at war-not only against the presumed enemy abroad but also with its own troubled conscience. Yet whether he is addressing the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the battle against the AIDS pandemic, or the culture wars surrounding the issues of feminism and gay marriage, Campo’s compelling poems affirm the notion that hope arises from even the most bitter of conflicts. That hope is that somehow we can be better than ourselves.

LC 2006035575, ISBN 978-0-8223-3862-8 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8223-3960-1 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: S


811.54

Platt, Donald

My Father Says Grace: Poems

96 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $16.00 paper, CIP included

March 2007

The University of Arkansas Press

In his third collection, My Father Says Grace, Donald Platt combines elegy with verse of larger historical allusion and reference. At the center of the book stand poems detailing a father’s stroke and slowly developing Alzheimer’s disease and how it affects one family. An extended meditation on a mother-in-law’s dying provides counterpoint to elegies for more public figures like Walt Whitman and Janis Joplin.

LC 2006031457, 978-1-55728-837-0

AASL: O/HS

PLA: not reviewed


811.54

Whalen, Philip (Edited by Michael Rothenberg)

The Collected Poems of Philip Whalen

812 pp., 6” x 9”, 92 doodles, bibliog., index, $49.95 cloth, CIP included

December 2007

Wesleyan University Press

One of the most path-breaking and creatively radical poets of the San Francisco Renaissance, Philip Whalen (1923-2002) was part of the 1955 Six Gallery reading where the West Coast Beat movement famously began. Working alongside Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, and Jack Kerouac, Whalen developed a conversational and visually unorthodox style that is unique in contemporary poetry. His lifelong engagement with the impermanent and sensuous, concerns deepened by his commitment to Zen Buddhism, are on rich display here, along with his warm humor and original illustrations. This Collected Poems rightfully places Whalen among the foremost poets of his time.

LC 2007016905, ISBN 978-0-8195-6859-5

AASL: O/HS, P

PLA: S


811.542

Valentine, Jean

Little Boat

80 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $22.95 cloth, CIP included

October 2007

Wesleyan University Press

Following her National Book Award-winning Door in the Mountain, Jean Valentine’s Little Boat continues her exploration of spiritual life, confronting the realities of aging and death in the serene and dreamlike voice so beloved by her many readers. Infusing even the most melancholy subjects with warmth and humanity, Little Boat explores such subjects as grief, ordinary objects, illness, and memory, carrying the reader into disparate worlds. The poet’s extraordinary juxtapositions blur the boundaries of the material world and the invisible, the given and the assumed, the present and the sometimes recently absent.

LC 2007013487, ISBN 978-0-8195-6850-2

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: S


811.6

Gomez, Gabriel

The Outer Bands

104 pp., 6” x 9”, $17.00 paper, CIP included

September 2007

University of Notre Dame Press

The Outer Bands is a first collection of poems from Andrés Montoya prize-winner Gabriel Gomez. The book is an expansive examination of language and landscape, voice and memory, where the balance between experimentation and tradition coexist. The poems realize a reconciliation between the writer’s voice and the voice of witness, wonder, and tragedy; a dialogue between two worlds that employs an equally paradoxical imagery of the American Southwest and the marshes of Southern Louisiana. The book concludes with its namesake poem, “The Outer Bands,” a twenty-eight-day chronicle of the days between Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita, which together decimated the Gulf Coast region in 2005.

LC 2007019490, ISBN 978-0-268-02972-2

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: RS


811.608

Finney, Nikky

The Ringing Ear: Black Poets Lean South

405 pp., 6” x 9”, $59.95 cloth, $18.95 paper, CIP included

March 2007

University of Georgia Press

In this new anthology, the first of its kind, more than one hundred contemporary black poets laugh at and cry about, pray for and curse, flee and return to—the South. Voices new to the scene appear alongside some of the leading names in American literature. “By writing about a region with its rich history and racial contradictions, these poets advance the impact of their poetry beyond historical and cultural boundaries. This is a timely, vital collection that insists the uses of poetry must be redefined and examined through the work of some of our best poets.”—The Bloomsbury Review

LC 2006031013, ISBN 978-0-8203-2925-3 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8203-2926-0 (p.)

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: O


811.622

Halperin, Mark

Falling Through the Music

80 pp., 5 3/4” x 9”, $18.00 paper, CIP included

March 2007

University of Notre Dame Press

“The mood of Mark Halperin’s new poems is autumnal and elegiac, yet the effect of his book is surprisingly bracing. This is due in no small measure to Halperin’s persona—he is trustworthy, unflappable, and a wryly unjudgmental observer of human folly. And, as readers of his work have come to know, his command of technique, whether of received form or of the prose poem, is considerable. This makes both his tender poems of family history and his poems drawn from his travels in Russia acts of wonderment.”—poet David Wojahn

LC 2006039803, ISBN 978-0-268-03081-0

AASL: G/P

PLA: G


812.52

Alonso, Harriet Hyman

Robert E. Sherwood: The Playwright in Peace and War

416 pp., 6” x 9”, 14 illus., $80.00 cloth, $28.95 paper, CIP included

December 2007

University of Massachusetts Press

Oscar and Pulitzer prize-winning writer and producer Robert E. Sherwood scripted some of the most popular plays and films of his day, including The Best Years of Our Lives, Idiot’s Delight, and Rebecca. Sherwood personal life, however, was driven by a deep conviction that war was a societal evil that must be eradicated and human rights a moral responsibility that all governments should protect. “This reader-friendly book written in lucid, accessible prose is an extraordinary accomplishment...Alonso’s handling of Sherwood’s journey provides pleasure, joy, and engagement for anyone interested in pacifism, war, peace, politics, theater, history and culture.”—Howard Stein, emeritus, Center for Theatre Studies, Columbia University

LC 20077022047, ISBN 978-1-55849-618-7 (c.), ISBN 978-1-55849-619-4 (p.)

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


812.52

O’Neill, Eugene (Introduction by Robert Brustein)

Collected Shorter Plays/Eugene O’Neill

320 pp., 5” x 7 3/4”, $15.95 paper

February 2007

Yale University Press

Eugene O’Neill (1889-1953), the father of American drama, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama four times and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1936. Here gathered in a single volume are nine one-act plays that span the poet’s career: Bound East for Cardiff; Fog; Thirst; The Long Voyage Home; Ile; The Moon of the Caribbees; In the Zone; The Hairy Ape; and Hughie. “[O’Neill] is the most American of our handful of dramatists who matter most.”—Harold Bloom

LC 2006928358, ISBN 978-0-300-10779-1

AASL: S/HS

PLA: G


812.54

Smith, Chuck

Best Black Plays: The Theodore Ward Prize for African American Playwriting

226 pp., 6 1/4” x 9 1/4”, $24.95 paper, CIP included

October 2007

Northwestern University Press

The Theodore Ward Prize has, over its twenty-year history, offered a rich reflection of the accomplishments of emerging and established black playwrights and their growing importance in contemporary theater. This volume showcases three winners of the Prize—plays that in their quality and subject matter aptly represent what is being written and produced by African American playwrights and theaters today. The publication of Leslie Lee’s Sundown Names and Night-Gone Things, Mark Clayton’s Southers’ Ma Noah and Kim Euell’s The Diva Daughters DuPree answers a growing demand for the work of African American playwrights.

LC 2007006118, ISBN 978-0-8101-2390-8

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


812.622

Gaunt, Carole O’Malley

Hungry Hill: A Memoir

304 pp., 6” x 9”, 10 illus., $19.95 paper, CIP included

June 2007

University of Massachusetts Press

On a sweltering June night in 1959, Betty O’Malley died from lymphatic cancer, leaving behind an alcoholic husband and eight shell-shocked children. The one daughter, Carole, was thirteen at the time. In this poignant memoir, she recalls in vivid detail the chaotic course of her family life over the next four years. “What readers will take away from it, besides Gaunt’s skillful wielding of language and narrative structure, is a sense of this Irish-Catholic teenager as a survivor who pushes back against the terrible tide of loss to seek her footing in the wider world.”—The Boston Globe

LC 2007002626, ISBN 978-1-55849-589-0

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: O


813

Montgomery, L.M.

Anne of Green Gables (Oxford Children’s Classics)

384 pp., 5 2/5” x 7 3/10”, $9.95 cloth

September 2007

Oxford University Press

An unabridged edition of the classic novel. Orphan Anne has always dreamed of being part of a proper family. So when she’s chosen to go and live with the Cuthberts, life looks grand. But the Cuthberts wanted a little boy to help them on Green Gables farm, not a girl. They cannot keep her.

LC 2007281880, ISBN 978-0-19272000-9

AASL: G/EM-HS

PLA: G


813

Sneve, Virginia Driving Hawk

Lana’s Lakota Moons

112 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $12.95 paper, CIP included

November 2007

University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books

Lori is a quiet, contemplative bookworm. Lana is an outspoken adventuress. Different as they are, they are first cousins, sisters in the Lakota way. And when both befriend a Hmong girl new to their school, the discovery of a culture so strange to them and so rich with possibilities brings them together as never before in an experience of life and loss. As the girls learn of the moons of the Lakota calendar, they also learn that the circle of life is never broken, even when death comes to one of them. Steeped in Lakota lore, this story of friendship illuminates profound truths about the human spirit.

LC 2007005469, ISBN 978-0-8032-6028-3

AASL: RG/MS, HS

PLA: RG


813.08

Sachsman, David B., S. Kittrell Rushing, and Roy Morris Jr. (Editors)

Memory and Myth: The Civil War in Fiction and Film from Uncle Tom’s Cabin to Cold Mountain

290 pp., 6” x 9”, $62.95 cloth, $29.95 paper, CIP included

May 2007

Purdue University Press

The Civil War is a central focus of American history and American historical scholarship, and yet our image of the time is of Scarlett O’Hara as much as it is of Abraham Lincoln. The 25 chapters of Memory and Myth examine the creative responses to the Civil War, and the ways in which artists as disparate as Margaret Mitchell and Alex Haley have sought to make sense of the war and to convey their findings to succeeding generations of readers and filmgoers. The book also examines the role of movies and television in transmuting the historical memories of the Civil War into durable, ever-changing myths.

LC 2006100291, ISBN 978-1-55753-439-2 (c.), ISBN 978-1-55753-440-8 (p.)

AASL: G/HS

PLA: O


813.2

Franklin, Wayne

James Fenimore Cooper: The Early Years

752 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, 20 b&w illus., bibliog., index, $40.00 cloth, CIP included

May 2007

Yale University Press

As the first treatment of Cooper’s life to be based on full access to his family papers, this is the definitive account of the famed writer’s life from his boyhood until 1826. “[A] deeply satisfying first volume of a definitive biography...profoundly enriches our understanding of how the young writer helped forge our national mythology.”—Booklist. “Cooper’s once-glowing reputation is finally returned to luster with this magnificent study by Franklin...Geared toward educated adults, this is also a good choice for those looking for an introduction to Cooper’s life and work. Highly recommended.”—Library Journal

LC 2006031247, ISBN 978-0-300-10805-7

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: O


813.3

Whitman, Walt

Franklin Evans or The Inebriate: A Tale of the Times

208 pp., 6” x 9”, 3 illus., bibliog., $74.95 cloth, $21.95 paper, CIP included

June 2007

Duke University Press

Franklin Evans, or The Inebriate was Walt Whitman’s first and only novel. The editors’ substantial introduction situates Franklin Evans in relation to Whitman’s life and career, mid-nineteenth-century American print culture, and many of the developments and institutions the novel depicts, including urbanization, immigration, slavery, the temperance movement, and new understandings of class, race, gender, and sexuality. This edition includes a short temperance story Whitman published at about the same time as he did Franklin Evans, the surviving fragment of what appears to be another unfinished temperance novel by Whitman, and a temperance speech Abraham Lincoln gave the same year that Franklin Evans was published.

LC 2007003431, ISBN 978-0-8223-3931-1 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8223-3942-7 (p.)

AASL: S/HS

PLA: G


813.52

Baird, Irene (Edited and with an introduction by Colin Hill)

Waste Heritage: A Novel

352 pp., 5 1/2” x 8”, notes, $35.00 paper, CIP included

November 2007

University of Ottawa Press

Irene Baird’s Waste Heritage is a groundbreaking work of Canadian fiction based on the dramatic and violent labor disputes that took place in British Columbia in 1938. The story follows the progress of Matt Striker, a 23-year-old from Saskatchewan, and his simple-minded companion Eddy, as they travel from Vancouver to Victoria. Empathetic and tragic, Waste Heritage has been praised as Canada’s Grapes of Wrath and the most important novel of its time. A new critical apparatus surrounds Baird’s original text, informing the reader of the historical and literary contexts of the work, as well as providing exhaustive textual analysis.

C2007-903933-2, ISBN 978-0-7766-0649-1

AASL: S/HS

PLA: G


813.52

Harker, Jaime

America the Middlebrow: Women’s Novels, Progressivism, and Middlebrow Authorship between the Wars

192 pp., 6” x 9”, 20 illus., $80.00 cloth, $24.95 paper, CIP included

July 2007

University of Massachusetts Press

Between the two world wars, American publishing entered a “golden age” characterized by an explosion of new publishers, authors, audiences, distribution strategies, and marketing techniques. The period was distinguished by a diverse literary culture, ranging from modern cultural rebels to working-class laborers, political radicals, and progressive housewives. Harker focuses on one neglected mode of authorship in the interwar period—women’s middlebrow authorship and its intersection with progressive politics.

LC 2007004497, ISBN 978-1-55849-596-8 (c.), ISBN 978-1-55849-597-5 (p.)

AASL: S/HS

PLA: S


813.52

Niggli, Josefina (Edited by William Orchard and Yolanda Padilla)

The Plays of Josefina Niggli: Recovered Landmarks of Latino Literature

288 pp., 6” x 9”, $75.00 cloth, $29.95 paper, CIP included

October 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press

Josefina Niggli (1910-1983) was one of the most successful Mexican American writers of the early twentieth century. Born of European parents and raised in Mexico, she spent most of her adult life in the United States. In her plays and novels she aimed to portray authentic Mexican experiences for English-speaking audiences. Niggli crossed borders, cultures, and genres. Her life and work prompt interesting questions about race, class, gender, ethnic and national identity, and the formation of literary canons. Although Niggli is perhaps best known for her fiction and folk plays, this anthology recovers her historical dramas, most of which are out of print or were never published.

LC 2007011824, ISBN 978-0-299-22450-9 (c.), ISBN 978-0-299-22454-7 (p.)

AASL: S/HS

PLA: O


813.52

Rideout, Walter B.

Sherwood Anderson: A Writer in America, Volume 2

520 pp., 6” x 9”, 14 b&w photos, $60.00 cloth, CIP included

January 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press

Sherwood Anderson: A Writer in America is a seminal work that reintroduces us to this important, yet recently neglected, American writer. This second volume of the two-volume work covers Anderson’s life after his move in the mid-1920s to “Ripshin,” his house near Marion, Virginia (where Vol. 1 ended). Volume 2 covers Anderson’s return to business pursuits; his extensive travels in the South touring factories, which resulted in his political involvement in labor struggles and several books on the topic; and his unexpected death in 1941. Rideout uncovers new information about events and people in Anderson’s life and provides a new perspective on many of his works.

LC 2005011164, ISBN 978-0-299-22020-4

AASL: O/HS

PLA: G


813.54

Carr, Pat

The Death of a Confederate Colonel: Civil War Stories and a Novella

176 pp., 6” x 9”, $14.95 paper, CIP included

March 2007

The University of Arkansas Press

Dramatically compelling and historically informed, The Death of a Confederate Colonel takes us into the lives of those left behind during the Civil War. These stories, all with Arkansas settings, are filled with the trauma of the time. They tell of a Confederate woman’s care of and growing affection for a wounded Union soldier, a plantation mistress’s singular love for a sick slave child, and an eight-year-old girl’s fight for survival against frigid cold, injury, starvation, heartbreak, and lawlessness.

LC 2006037502, ISBN 978-1-55728-835-6

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: O


813.54

Holmes, Linda Janet and Cheryl A. Wall (Editors)

Savoring the Salt: The Legacy of Toni Cade Bambara

296 pp., 6” x 9”, 14 b&w illus., index, $74.50 cloth, $23.95 paper, CIP included

December 2007

Temple University Press

A host of poets, scholars, writers, political activists and filmmakers recall Toni Cade Bambara, a woman whose voice and vision played a vital role in shaping African American culture in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Bambara’s multifaceted career took off with the publication of her collection of stories, Gorilla, My Love in 1972 and ended abruptly with her death in 1995. In that time, she produced stories, a novel, a book of non-fiction, a documentary film—and remained dedicated to teaching and political work. The book examines these aspects of Bambara’s life and work; each section begins with an excerpt from her writings, some unpublished until now.

LC 2007008836, ISBN 978-1-59213-624-7 (c.), ISBN 978-1-59213-625-4 (p.)

AASL: S/HS

PLA: O


813.54

Rhodes, Richard

The Ungodly: A Novel of the Donner Party

384 pp., 6” x 9”, $17.95 paper

March 2007

Stanford University Press

Upon its initial printing in 1973, Rhodes’s masterful tale was praised for its realistic and gripping depiction of the struggles faced by the ill-fated group of men, women, and children of the Donner Party. Now, more than thirty years later, Stanford University Press has reissued this harrowing and haunting novel. The Ungodly is an unforgettable story of terrible hardship and awesome courage—a story that increases our understanding of what kind of people made this nation and what a full and immeasurable price they paid.

LC 2007001781, ISBN 978-0-8047-5641-9

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


813.54

Vivante, Arturo

Truelove Knot: A Novel of World War II

224 pp., 6” x 9”, $22.00 paper, CIP included

April 2007

University of Notre Dame Press

“Poignant reflections on finding hope in small freedoms, and in poetry, help make the latest from Vivante (Solitude & Other Stories) quietly convincing.”—Publishers Weekly. “Admirers of Arturo Vivante’s fiction have reason to rejoice in this eagerly-awaited new novel which shows Vivante at the top of his form, with his characteristic exquisite prose and masterful story telling...Truelove Knot is a vivid record of a part of World War II which has rarely been documented. It’s a novel of suspense and surprises, but it is also a hauntingly beautiful tribute to the enduring power of love.”—Corinne Demas, author of What We Save For Last

LC 2006039804, ISBN 978-0-268-04368-1

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


813.54

Young, Phyllis Brett

The Torontonians: A Novel

358 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $24.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

McGill-Queen’s University Press

The arrival, one sunny morning, of pale green wall-to-wall carpeting for the living room is the crowning jewel in Karen Whitney’s long-anticipated transformation of her house into a beautiful home. The banal finality of this event triggers an introspective voyage through the events of her life and how she became who she is. Before Betty Friedan coined the term feminine mystique, The Torontonians told a classic feminist story of suburban ennui and existential self-discovery, tracing a detailed portrait of femininity in the 1950s through the eyes of its perceptive and thoughtful heroine.

C2007-904503-0, ISBN 978-0-7735-3324-0

AASL: RG/HS

PLA: RG


813.6

Apps, Jerry

In a Pickle: A Family Farm Story

256 pp., 6” x 9”, $24.95 cloth, CIP included

September 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press/Terrace Books

Set in 1955. Andy Meyer, a young farmer, manages the pickle factory in Link Lake, a rural town where the farms are small, the conversation is meandering, and the feeling is distinctly Midwestern. But the H. H. Harlow Pickle Company appears in town, using heavy-handed tactics to force family farmers to farm their way. Andy, himself the owner of a half-acre pickle patch, works part-time for the Harlow Company, a conflict that places him between the family farm and the big corporation. As he sees how Harlow begins to change the rural community and the lives of its people, Andy must make personal, ethical, and life-changing decisions.

LC 2007011563, ISBN 978-0-299-22300-7

AASL: G/HS

PLA: O, R


813.6

Corso, Paola

Giovanna’s 86 Circles: And Other Stories

150 pp., 6” x 9”, $21.95 cloth, $16.95 paper, CIP included

May 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press/Terrace Books

In this mesmerizing fiction debut, Italian American women and girls spin their culture’s lore to enliven a dying steel town. Even a wrecking ball is no match for the legend of Giovanna’s green thumb in the title story. Quirky and profound, Paola Corso’s magical leaps reveal the poetry of these women’s lives. “Captivating storytelling in the tradition of Italian fairytale makers.”—Rain Taxi. “Paola Corso conjures a world...a humble if pinched society, down on its luck but at least rich in tradition. She honors that fact here, and then some.”—The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “Beautifully written, strong female characters, and adolescent themes will attract good readers to this little gem of a book.”—Pennsylvania School Librarians’ Association

LC 2005005437, ISBN 978-0-299-21280-3 (c.), ISBN 978-0-299-21284-1 (p.)

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: G


813.6

Jacobsen, Annie, Jane Finlay-Young, and Di Brandt

Watermelon Syrup: A Novel

265 pp., 6” x 9”, $24.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

Wilfrid Laurier University Press

Lexi, a young Mennonite woman from Saskatchewan, comes to work as housekeeper and nanny for a doctorate’s family in Waterloo, Ontario, during the Depression. Called home to care for her mother, Lexi finds a journal, in which she reads of a tragedy that reconciles her early memories of her mother as joyful and loving with the burdened woman she became in Canada. Lexi returns to Waterloo, where a crisis of her own, coupled with the knowledge of this secret, serves as the catalyst for her realization that, unlike her mother, she must create her own destiny.

ISBN 978-1-55458-005-7

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


813.6

Muaddi Darraj, Susan

The Inheritance of Exile: Stories from South Philly

208 pp., 6” x 9”, $20.00 paper, CIP included

April 2007

University of Notre Dame Press

“Darraj succeeds admirably in suggesting the diversity of Palestinian-Americans: the four friends Nadia, Aliyah, Hanan and Reema each comes from a family with its own story of exile...There’s a passionate sense here of inheritance as a two-way street that transforms immigrants and their children...”—Publishers Weekly. “In Muaddi Darraj’s work, the idea of being a ‘native’ becomes gnarled and complex. What makes the collection particularly strong is the range of characters for whom she can feel deep empathy-young, old Palestinian, American.”—Baltimore City Paper

LC 2007002523, ISBN 978-0-268-03503-7

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: RG


813.622

Halaby, Laila

Once in a Promised Land

338 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $23.95 cloth, $14.00 paper, CIP included

January 2007

Beacon Press

Once in a Promised Land is the story of Jassim and Salwa, who left the deserts of their native Jordan for those of Arizona. Although the couple lives far from Ground Zero, it’s impossible to escape the nationwide fallout from 9/11. When Jassim kills a teenage boy in a terrible accident and Salwa becomes hopelessly entangled with a shady young American, their tenuous lives in exile and their fragile marriage begin to unravel. This intimate account of two parallel lives is an achingly honest look at what it means to straddle cultures, to be viewed with suspicion, and to struggle to find safe haven.

LC 2006014841, ISBN 978-0-8070-8390-1 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8070-8391-8 (p.)

AASL: G/HS

PLA: O


818.303

Thoreau, Henry D.(Edited by Jeffrey S. Cramer)

I to Myself: An Annotated Selection from the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau

528 pp., 7 1/2” x 9 1/4”, 12 b&w illus., bibliog., index, $35.00 cloth, CIP included

October 2007

Yale University Press

It was his friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, who urged Thoreau to keep a record of his thoughts and observations. Begun in 1837, Thoreau’s journal spans a period of twenty-five years and runs to more than two million words, coming to a halt only in 1861, shortly before the author’s death. The handwritten journal had somewhat humble origins, but as it grew in scope and ambition it came to function as a record of Thoreau’s interior life as well as the source for his books and essays. Critics now recognize Thoreau’s journal as an important artistic achievement in its own right.

LC 2007014317, ISBN 978-0-300-11172-9

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


818.52

Malcolm, Janet

Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice

240 pp., 5 1/4” x 7 3/4”, 12 b&w illus., $25.00 cloth, CIP included

August 2007

Yale University Press

Named one of the 100 Notable Books of the Year by The New York Times Book Review. “In this startling study of Stein and her partner... acclaimed journalist Malcolm puts their relationship in a new light...A joy to read...[and] an important work.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review). “Brilliant, penetrating, and playful.”—The New York Times Book Review. “Shrewd, humane, and beautifully written.”—Wall Street Journal. “Remarkable...The most intelligent sort of biography.”—The New York Review of Books.

LC 2007012085, ISBN 978-0-300-12551-1

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


818.609

Hall, Meredith

Without a Map: A Memoir

221 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $24.95 cloth, $14.00 paper, CIP included

April 2007

Beacon Press

Meredith Hall’s moving but unsentimental memoir begins in 1965, when she becomes pregnant at sixteen. Shunned by her insular New Hampshire community, she is then kicked out of the house by her mother. Her father and stepmother reluctantly take her in, hiding her before they finally banish her altogether. After giving her baby up for adoption, Hall wanders recklessly through the Middle East, then returns to New England and stitches together a life that encircles her silenced and invisible grief. When her lost son, at age 21, finds her, their reunion is tender, turbulent, and ultimately redemptive.

LC 2006027507, ISBN 978-0-8070-7273-8 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8070-7274-5 (p.)

AASL: G/HS

PLA: O, G


Return to Top

820-829 British Literature


820.911

Gillies, Mary Ann and Aurelea Mahood

Modernist Literature: An Introduction

224 pp., 6” x 9”, $85.00 cloth, $24.95 paper, CIP included

June 2007

McGill-Queen’s University Press

Covering key canonical texts as well as lesser-known works, this engaging volume provides a comprehensive and critical assessment of British literature from the beginning of the twentieth century up to World War II. The book adopts a unique structure in which individual chapters focus on a single decade, a distinct genre, and a specific theme. This balance of the historical and aesthetic contexts of modernist literature gives students and general readers a culturally informed overview of the movement, while also posing intriguing questions and offering re-evaluative readings of modernist experiments in representation. Each chapter includes a detailed chronology and further readings.

C2007-900687-6, ISBN 978-0-7735-3292-2 (c.), ISBN 978-0-7735-3293-9 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: RS


820.93

Sherwood, Terry G.

The Self in Early Modern Literature: For the Common Good

384 pp., 6” x 9”, index, $60.00 cloth, CIP included

July 2007

Duquesne University Press

This study is a response to a continuing debate stimulated primarily by cultural materialist and new historicist claims that the early modern self was decentered and fragmented by forces in Elizabethan and Jacobean England. Terry Sherwood enters this debate by rejecting claims of such radical discontinuity characterizing a “contingent” and “provisional” self incapable of unified subjectivity. Sherwood examines the theoretical issues in an introductory chapter, followed by chapters discussing central aspects of five major early modern writers whose works variously incorporate elements in Protestant vocation and Christian civic humanism.

LC 2006039055, ISBN 978-0-8207-0395-4

AASL: S/P

PLA: S


820.935

Macpherson, Heidi Slettedahl

Courting Failure: Women and the Law in Twentieth-Century Literature

264 pp., 6” x 9”, bibliog., $52.95 cloth, $24.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

The University of Akron Press

Courting Failure critically explores the representation of women, fictional and historical, in conflict with the law. Macpherson focuses on the judicial system and the staging of women’s guilt, examining both the female suspect and the female victim in a wide variety of media, including novels like Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace, movies such as ‘I Want to Live!’ and ‘Legally Blonde’, and the television series ‘Ally McBeal.’ In these texts and others, Macpherson exposes the court as an arena in which women often fail, or succeed only by subverting the system. Combining feminist literary theory with the discourse of the law and literature movement.

LC 2006039518, ISBN 978-1-931968-47-8 (c.), ISBN 978-1-931968-48-5 (p.)

AASL: O, G/HS, P

PLA: G


821

Katz, Joy and Kevin Prufer (Editors)

Dark Horses: Poets on Overlooked Poems

216 pp., 8 3/4”x 6”, $50.00 cloth, $19.95 paper, CIP included

January 2007

University of Illinois Press

Seventy-five established American poets including Billy Collins, John Ashbery, Linda Bierds, Carl Phillips, C. K. Williams, Wanda Coleman, Miller Williams, and Dana Gioia have each selected one unjustly neglected poem, most never previously anthologized, and written a concise commentary to accompany it. Selections include forgotten gems by well known poets as well as poems by writers who have fallen into obscurity. Dark Horses also acts as a primer on how to creatively read a poem and a documentary of the bonds between a poem and its reader.

LC 2005013683, ISBN 978-0-252-03053-6 (c.), ISBN 978-0-252-07287-1 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: O, G


821.009

Shaw, Robert

Blank Verse: A Guide to Its History and Use

319 pp., 6” x 9”, index, $36.95 cloth, $18.95 paper, CIP included

May 2007

Ohio University Press

“Robert B. Shaw’s Blank Verse is a remarkable history-in-little of the crucial question of poetry written in English that takes the form of blank verse or unrhymed iamic pentameter. William Shakespeare, John Milton, and William Wordsworth are necessarily the greatest poets analyzed by Shaw, but he gives particular emphasis to the twentieth century and to ongoing literary history. The book’s achievement is considerable: it offers accurate instruction in prosody and a vast store of curious and useful information about particular poets and their poems.”—Harold Bloom

LC 2006033521, ISBN 978-0-8214-1757-7 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8214-1758-4 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: not reviewed


821.4

Shawcross, John T. and Michael Lieb

Paradise Lost: “A Poem Written in Ten Books”: An Authoritative Text of the 1667 First Edition

456 pp., 7” x 10”, $68.00 cloth, CIP included

November 2007

Duquesne University Press

Paradise Lost: A Poem Written in Ten Books” is the first such presentation of the first edition of this major epic of English literature. Making available this text in authoritative form, Shawcross and Lieb have sought to underscore the significance of the epic as Milton originally conceived it. Although the 1674 edition has customarily been adapted as the basis for modern publications of the poem, the availability of this authoritative text of the 1667 edition invites a reconsideration of Milton’s original intentions in light of the changes made evident in the revised text.

LC 2007025652, ISBN 978-0-8207-0392-3

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: G


821.914

Davis, William V.

R. S. Thomas: Poetry and Theology

235 pp., 6” x 9”, bibliog., references, index, $39.95 paper, CIP included

July 2007

Baylor University Press

This volume celebrates the work of the Welsh poet R. S. Thomas (1913-2000) and illuminates the theological implications of this famous twentieth-century poet-priest’s pilgrimage. By providing detailed readings of individual poems, Davis explores the depth and imagination of Thomas’s profound theological vision.

LC 2007014014, ISBN 978-1-932792-49-2

AASL: S/HS, P

PLA: not reviewed


822.33

Nuttall, A. D.

Shakespeare the Thinker

448 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, 1 illus., bibliog., index, $30.00 cloth, $19.00 paper, CIP included

May 2007

Yale University Press

A marvelous inquiry into the questions that engrossed Shakespeare throughout his life. Nuttall investigates the dynamic nature of Shakespeare’s evolving answers and provides an unparalleled guide to Shakespeare’s plays. “The best book on the subject in recent years.”—Times Higher Education Supplement. “Comprehensive, insightful, lucid, and utterly fascinating...an indispensable guide... that will benefit beginners as much as tenured professors...Essential.”—Choice. “This text will be in demand because of Nuttall’s reputation as a scholar and author.”—Library Journal. A 2007 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title.

LC 2006052827, ISBN 978-0-300-11928-2 (c.), ISBN 978-0-300-13629-6 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: O, S


822.33

Shakespeare, William (Annotated, with an introduction, by Burton Raffel; Essay by Harold Bloom)

Antony and Cleopatra (The Annotated Shakespeare)

256 pp., 5” x 7 3/4”, $6.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

Yale University Press

Part of the Annotated Shakespeare series, this text includes a critical essay by Harold Bloom, as well as comprehensive on-page annotations. In no other play has Shakespeare created two such equally titanic personages as Rome’s great soldier and statesman Mark Antony and Egypt’s Queen Cleopatra. Shakespeare stood at the height of his powers when he penned this great tragedy, one of the last he produced. “The volumes in this series will enrich any library that stocks editions of individual Shakespearean plays.”—Judith McGowan, Chairperson, American University Press Books Committee, 2007

LC 2007021005, ISBN 978-0-300-12473-6

AASL: O/HS, P

PLA: G


822.33

Shakespeare, William (Annotated, with an introduction, by Burton Raffel; Essay by Harold Bloom)

King Lear (The Annotated Shakespeare)

256 pp., 5” x 7 3/4”, $6.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

Yale University Press

King Lear, one of Shakespeare’s darkest and most savage plays, tells the story of the foolish and Job-like Lear, who divides his kingdom, as he does his affections, according to vanity and whim. Lear’s failure as a father engulfs himself and his world in turmoil and tragedy. Part of the Annotated Shakespeare series, this text includes a critical essay by Harold Bloom, as well as comprehensive on-page annotations. “The volumes in this series will enrich any library that stocks editions of individual Shakespearean plays.”—Judith McGowan, Chairperson, American University Press Books Committee, 2006-07

LC 2006036627, ISBN 978-0-300-12200-8

AASL: O/HS, P

PLA: G


822.33

Shakespeare, William (Annotated, with an introduction, by Burton Raffel; Essay by Harold Bloom)

Twelfth Night: or, What You Will (The Annotated Shakespeare)

192 pp., 5” x 7 3/4”, $6.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

Yale University Press

Twelfth Night, one of Shakespeare’s funniest and most romantic plays, follows Viola, a young noblewoman, as she is shipwrecked in a foreign land and enters the service of Orsino, the duke of Illyria—as a man. Complications ensue—deceptions, infatuations, misdirected overtures, and malevolent pranks—as everyone is drawn into the hilarious confusion. Part of the Annotated Shakespeare series, this text includes a critical essay by Harold Bloom, as well as comprehensive on-page annotations. “The volumes in this series will enrich any library that stocks editions of individual Shakespearean plays.”—Judith McGowan, Chairperson, American University Press Books Committee, 2006-07

LC 2006036233, ISBN 978-0-300-11563-5

AASL: O/HS, P

PLA: G


822.332

Cox, John D.

Seeming Knowledge: Shakespeare and Skeptical Faith

350 pp., 6” x 9”, bibliog., references, index, $39.95 cloth, CIP included

September 2007

Baylor University Press

Seeming Knowledge revisits the question of Shakespeare and religion by focusing on the conjunction of faith and skepticism in his writing. Cox argues that this is not an invented conjunction, but rather the recognition of the history of faith and skepticism in the sixteenth century illuminates a tradition that Shakespeare inherited and represented more subtly and effectively than any other writer of his generation.

LC 2007022393, ISBN 978-1-932792-95-9

AASL: O/HS

PLA: S


823

Stevenson, Robert Louis

Treasure Island (Oxford Children’s Classics)

275 pp., 5 3/10” x 7 3/10”, $9.95 cloth

September 2007

Oxford University Press

An unabridged edition of the classic novel. When Jim Hawkins discovers a dead man’s map it’s not long before he’s off to sea in search of distant treasure. But trouble boarded the ship with him, in the shape of the ship’s cook, Long John Silver. He is leading a mutinous band of pirates who decide they want the treasure for themselves—and will do anything to get it...

LC 2007281881, ISBN 978-0-19271998-0

AASL: G/EM, MS

PLA: G


823.085

Regis, Pamela

A Natural History of the Romance Novel

240 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $24.95 cloth, $19.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

University of Pennsylvania Press

Pamela Regis argues that the romance novel, the most popular but least respected of literary genres, does not enslave women but celebrates their freedom and joy. Regis provides critics with an expanded vocabulary for discussing a genre that is both classic and contemporary, sexy and entertaining.

LC 2002045412, ISBN 978-0-8122-3303-2 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8122-1522-9 (p.)

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: G


823.622

Devonshire, Georgiana Spencer Cavendish (Edited, with an introduction, by Jonathan Gross)

The Sylph: A Novel

245 pp., 6” x 9”, $18.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

Northwestern University Press

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire (b. 1757), led a fascinating and scandalous life in late eighteenth-century England. She was a gambler, socialite, close friend of Marie Antoinette, an ancestor of Princess Diana, but also, secretly, a novelist. More than two hundred years after its original publication, The Sylph, Georgiana’s breathtaking insider’s portrait of her world, will captivate this generation. Mirroring Georgiana’s own experiences, particularly with gambling and marital infidelity, this compelling epistolary novel presents a unique window into elite life of the late 1700s. “[A] witty, accomplished portrait of Georgian society, written from the unique perspective of its biggest trendsetter.”—Booklist

LC 2007017821, ISBN 978-0-8101-2229-1

AASL: S/HS, P

PLA: O, G


823.8

Liebow, Ely M.

Dr. Joe Bell: Model for Sherlock Holmes

286 pp., 6” x 9”, 23 b&w photos, $26.95 paper

April 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press/Popular Press

A physician and professor of medicine at Edinburgh University, and a forensic expert for the British Crown, Joseph Bell was well known for his remarkable powers of observation and deduction. In what would become true Sherlockian fashion, he had the ability to deduce facts about his patients from otherwise unremarkable details. This biography is required reading for anyone interested in Victorian medicine, the history of detective fiction, and in Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. “Thoroughly researched, fully illustrated, and enthusiastically written, [Liebow’s] biography paints a splendid portrait of the man Doyle once called ‘the most notable of the characters whom I met’ at Edinburgh.”—The Baker Street Journal

LC 2007279756, ISBN 978-0-87972-198-5

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


823.8

Pite, Ralph

Thomas Hardy: The Guarded Life

544 pp., 6 1/8” x 9 1/4”, 36 illus., bibliog., index, $35.00 cloth

February 2007

Yale University Press

Ralph Pite’s biography of Thomas Hardy challenges long-held views of the popular Victorian novelist and contextualizes him in his family, socially, and geographically, revealing previously obscure details of Hardy’s personal and emotional life. “Through careful research and close readings of Hardy’s work, Pite recovers the psychological confusion that Hardy sought—with astonishing success—to keep out of the public eye.”—Booklist (starred review). “Pite’s treatment... offers [an] admirable portrait.”—Library Journal. “Marked by rigorous detail, playful speculation, and psychological evocation...Highly recommended.”—Choice (Editor’s Pick).

LC 2006934016, ISBN 978-0-300-12337-1

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


823.822

Kipling, Rudyard

The Jungle Book (Oxford Children’s Classics)

181 pp., 5 3/10” x 7 3/10”, $9.95 cloth

September 2007

Oxford University Press

An unabridged edition of the classic novel. Mowgli is found in the jungle by wolves, who bring him up as one of their own. The jungle is no easy place to live for a man-cub, and Mowgli must learn its secrets from Baloo the bear, Bagheera the black panther and Kaa the python. But their lessons cannot protect Mowgli from every danger—will he escape from his kidnap by the Monkey-People? And can he get the better of the evil tiger, Shere Khan?

LC 2007281121, ISBN 978-0-19272002-3

AASL: G/EM, MS

PLA: G


823.912

Hart, Trevor and Ivan Khovacs (Editors)

Tree of Tales: Tolkien, Literature, and Theology

146 pp., 6” x 9”, bibliog., references, index, $24.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

Baylor University Press

This work examines the theological relationship between creation and creativity in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. It does so by bringing together a synthesis of various disciplines and perspectives to the creativity of J.R.R. Tolkien. Hart and Khovacs provide a fresh reading of these important themes in Tolkien, and the result captures the multi-faceted nature of Tolkien’s own vivid theology and literary imagination.

LC 2007007096, ISBN 978-1-932792-64-5

AASL: G/HS, P

PLA: O, S


823.92

Newington, Nina

Where Bones Dance: An English Girlhood, An African War

318 pp., 6” x 9”, $26.95 cloth, CIP included

April 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press/Terrace Books

In this novel, a child dissects the darkness at the heart of her British diplomatic family. Living in Nigeria on the brink of civil war, Anna—also known as Jake—becomes blood brothers with Dave, the Korean American daughter of a C.I.A. operative. They do push-ups, collect pornography, and plot lives of unmarried freedom while around them a country disintegrates. Luscious, terrifying, and raw, Nigeria itself becomes a lesson in endurance, suffering, and love. Sensual and fantastical by turns, this immensely readable book delivers an understanding of the interplay of sexuality, gender, race, and war that is sophisticated beyond the years of its intrepid narrator.

LC 2006031769, ISBN 978-0-299-22260-4

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


Return to Top

830-899 Literature of Other Languages


839.1

Anctil, Pierre, Norman Ravvin, and Sherry Simon (Editors)

New Readings of Yiddish Montreal

136 pp., 11” x 8”, 14 b&w photos, $38.00 paper, CIP included

June 2007

University of Ottawa Press

This trilingual collection—with articles in English and French, including their Yiddish source texts—is the first extended examination of Yiddish intellectualism in Montreal. It examines the practice and the methods of the translators and scholars who have unveiled the historical, literary, and intellectual contributions of Yiddish in Montreal, which until recently remained obscure or inaccessible.

C2006-906488-1E, ISBN 978-2-7603-0631-8

AASL: RG/HS

PLA: R


839.133

Shapiro, Lamed (Edited and with an introduction by Leah Garrett)

The Cross and Other Jewish Stories (New Yiddish Library Series)

272 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/4”, $30.00 cloth, CIP included

January 2007

Yale University Press

This book is the first critical edition of the life and work of Yiddish author Lamed Shapiro, whose groundbreaking short stories, novellas, and essays are crucial to an understanding of Yiddish modernism. Despite his own deeply troubled life, Shapiro’s writings are innovative and rich with insights into Jewish history and culture. “This collection, including the classic translations of the great stories...as well as...previously untranslated fiction will be of great importance to all who teach modern Jewish literature, culture, and history.”—Kathryn Hellerstein, University of Pennsylvania. “Captures Shapiro’s uniquely fused lyricism and power.”—Ruth R. Wisse, Harvard University.

LC 2006018701, ISBN 978-0-300-11069-2

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


841.4

Fontaine, Jean De La (Translated by Norman R. Shapiro; Illustrations by David Schorr)

The Complete Fables of Jean De La Fontaine

460 pp., 8 3/4”x 6”, 17 illus., $80.00 cloth, $25.00 paper, CIP included

October 2007

University of Illinois Press

Told in an elegant style, Jean de la Fontaine’s (1621-95) charming animal fables depict sly foxes and scheming cats, vain birds and greedy wolves, all of which subtly express his penetrating insights into French society and the beasts found in all of us. Norman R. Shapiro has been translating La Fontaine’s fables for over twenty years, capturing the original work’s lively mix of plain and archaic language. This newly complete translation is destined to set the English standard for this work.

LC 2007005144, ISBN 978-0-252-03144-1 (c.), ISBN 978-0-252-07381-6 (p.)

AASL: O/MS, HS

PLA: O


843.54

Thériault, Yves (Translated by Don Wilson and Paul Socken)

Aaron

126 pp., 6” x 9”, $19.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

Wilfrid Laurier University Press

An exploration of “otherness,” the story centres on Moshe, an Orthodox Jew and refugee from Russia, who is raising his grandson, Aaron, alone in Montreal, following the death of the boy’s parents. Moshe works as a tailor, maintains his strict adherence to Orthodoxy, and educates Aaron to follow in his path. Aaron becomes increasingly estranged from his grandfather’s ways, however, and his meeting with the militantly secular Jewish girl Viedna confirms his decision to embrace modernity, secularism, and materialism and to reject his faith entirely. Possibly Thériault’s finest novel, Aaron is a parable of our modern world and a poignant cautionary tale.

ISBN 978-1-55458-002-6

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: G


843.8

Verne, Jules (Translated by Stanford L. Luce; Edited by Arthur B. Evans)

The Kip Brothers

514 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, 60 b&w illus., bibliog., $29.95 cloth, CIP included

May 2007

Wesleyan University Press

Castaways on a barren island in the South Seas, Karl and Pieter Kip are rescued by the brig James Cook. After helping to quell an onboard mutiny, however, they suddenly find themselves accused and convicted of the captain’s murder. In this story, one of his last Voyages Extraordinaires, Verne interweaves an exciting exploration of the South Pacific with a tale of judicial error reminiscent of the infamous Dreyfus Affair. This Wesleyan edition brings together the first English translation with one of the first detailed critical analyses of the novel, and features all the illustrations from the original 1902 publication.

LC 2006046114, ISBN 978-0-8195-6704-8

AASL: O/HS

PLA: G


843.822

Verne, Jules (Edited and Translated by William Butcher)

Lighthouse at the End of the World: The First English Translation of Verne’s Original Manuscript

210 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $29.95 cloth, $15.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

University of Nebraska Press/Bison Books

At the extreme tip of South America, Staten Island has piercing Antarctic winds, lonely coasts assaulted by breakers, and sailors lost as their vessels smash on the dark rocks. Now that civilization dares to rule here, a lighthouse penetrates the last and wildest place of all. But Vasquez, the guardian of the sacred light, has not reckoned with the vicious, desperate Kongre gang, who murder his two friends and force him out into the wilderness. Alone, without resources, can he foil their cruel plans? The master storyteller returns here to the theme of civilization against its two oldest enemies: pitiless nature and men’s savagery.

LC 2007001717, ISBN 978-0-8032-4676-8 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8032-6007-8 (p.)

AASL: S/HS

PLA: G


863.01

Edwards, Jennifer Gabrielle (Translator and Compiler)

The Flight of the Condor: Stories of Violence and War from Colombia

192 pp., 6” x 9”, $65.00 cloth, $26.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press

These stories from Colombia contain pain and love, and even humor, allowing us to see an utterly vibrant and pulsating country. We encounter townspeople overcome by fear, a man begging unsuccessfully for his life, an execution delayed for Christmas, the sounds and smells of burning coffee plantations, and other glimpses of daily life. This fiction anthology reflects some of Colombia’s finest literary talent, and most appear here for the first time in English translation. They reveal the contradictions and complexities of the human condition, yet they also offer hope for the future.

LC 2007011784, ISBN 978-0-299-22360-1 (c.), ISBN 978-0-299-22364-9 (p.)

AASL: RG/HS

PLA: O


863.01

Loss, Jacqueline and Esther Whitfield (Editors)

New Short Fiction from Cuba

256 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $21.95 paper, CIP included

September 2007

Northwestern University Press

The twelve stories in New Short Fiction from Cuba were written in Cuba and are published in English for the first time here. They differ widely in style and theme: from an impromptu encounter with Ernest Hemingway to an imagined romance mapped onto Cuba’s foundational nineteenth-century novel; from a witty, Borgesian satire on bureaucracy to a gothic adventure in homosexual voyeurism and mental illness; from an allegorical travelogue set in repressive China to a semi-surreal celebration of angels in Havana. These are the voices of Cuban fiction today, reflecting the past, anticipating the future, and composing, in their infinite variety, the stories of Cuban culture.

LC 2007012855, ISBN 978-0-8101-2406-6

AASL: S/HS

PLA: S


863.64

Borinsky, Alicia

Golpes bajos/Low Blows: Instantáneas/Snapshots

216 pp., 6” x 9”, $24.95 cloth, CIP included

April 2007

The University of Wisconsin Press

In these short, bilingual stories set in Buenos Aires (each piece appearing in Spanish and English on facing pages), Alicia Borinsky provides unique glimpses into the lives of the city’s inhabitants: its businessmen and tango dancers, politicians and torturers, triumphant divas and discarded children—a gallery of characters from a broad spectrum of contemporary Argentine society. She portrays a world of violence, corruption, love, and betrayal. The brevity of the pieces suggests a breathlessness and ephemeral quality, the fast-paced rhythm of the present. Civil wars are fought, shady deals are made, unwanted children are born. And in Borinsky’s ironic but life-affirming prose, human foibles are exposed.

LC 2006031484, ISBN 978-0-299-21600-9

PLA: G


868.64

Schuessler, Michael K.

Elena Poniatowska: An Intimate Biography

272 pp., 6” x 9”, 40 illus., $19.95 paper, CIP included

April 2007

The University of Arizona Press

Elena Poniatowska is a feisty, opinionated, socially-conscious writer who is widely known in Mexico and deserves to be better known everywhere else, as this critical biography-cum-personal portrait reveals. With Poniatowska’s complete cooperation, Michael Schuessler provides the first comprehensive look at her engrossing life and equally engaging body of work. His portrait is itself a literary collage, a “living kaleidoscope” that is constantly shifting to include a multiplicity of voices—those of fellow writers, literary critics, her nanny, her mother, and the writer herself—easily accessible to general readers and essential to scholars. Includes photographs, drawings and an annotated bibliography of Poniatowska’s works.

LC 2006030298, ISBN 978-0-8165-2501-0

AASL: RS/HS

PLA: S


882.01

Sophocles (Translated by David R. Slavitt)

The Theban Plays of Sophocles (The Yale New Classics Series)

256 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/4”, $28.00 cloth, CIP included

April 2007

Yale University Press

One of the most important translators of our time presents an elegant and economical version of Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannos, and Oedipus at Colonus. David R. Slavitt preserves the innate verve and energy of the dramas for a fresh rendition that will appeal both to readers and to theater audiences. “Clarity, directness, nobility without pretension, beauty simply expressed...a masterly sense of English syntax and word-music. This is a translation meant to be heard in a theater as well as read on a page.”—Michael Dirda, Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and essayist.

LC 2006026965, ISBN 978-0-300-11776-9

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: G


891.55

Wolpe, Sholeh

Sin: Selected Poems of Forugh Farrokhzad

160 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $22.95 cloth, CIP included

October 2007

The University of Arkansas Press

For the first time, the work of Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad is being brought to English-speaking readers through the perspective of a translator who is a poet in her own right, fluent in both Persian and English and intimately familiar with each culture. Sin includes the entirety of Farrokhzad’s last book, numerous selections from her fourth and most enduring book, Reborn, and selections from her earlier work and creates a collection that is true to the meaning, the intention, and the music of the original poems.

LC 2007023272, ISBN 978-1-55728-861-5

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: S


891.853

Andrzejewski, Jerzy

Holy Week: A Novel of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

177 pp., 6” x 9”, photos, $39.95 cloth, $19.95 paper, CIP included

January 2007

Ohio University Press

Holy Week, published in Poland in 1945 and only now appearing in the West, creates in one slim volume a vivid world peopled by believable and sympathetic characters whose lives depict with gripping accuracy an entire historical era...This work with its ironic title, portrays how the church utterly failed to provide moral guidance during the tragedy. Utterly recommended to all readers with an interest in world history.”—Library Journal

LC 2006024584, ISBN 978-0-8214-1715-7 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8214-1716-4 (p.)

AASL: G/HS

PLA: G


895.1

Okamoto, Kido

The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichi: Detective Stories of Old Edo

376 pp., 5 1/2” x 8 1/2”, $50.00 cloth, $24.00 paper, CIP included

January 2007

University of Hawai’i Press

“That year, quite a shocking incident occurred. . . .” So reminisces old Hanshichi in a story from one of Japan’s most beloved works of popular literature, Hanshichi torimonochô. Told through the eyes of a street-smart detective, Okamoto Kidô’s best-known work inaugurated the historical detective genre in Japan, spawning stage, radio, movie, and television adaptations as well as countless imitations. This selection of fourteen stories, translated into English for the first time, provides a fascinating glimpse of life in feudal Edo (later Tokyo) and rare insight into the development of the fledgling Japanese crime novel.

LC 2006228182, ISBN 978-0-8248-3053-3 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8248-3100-4 (p.)

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: S


895.1

Wong, Timonthy C.

Sherlock in Shanghai: Stories of Crime and Detection

232 pp., 5 5/8” x 8 3/8”, $55.00 cloth, $24.00 paper, CIP included

January 2007

University of Hawai’i Press

Shanghai in the 1920s and 1930s was both a glittering metropolis and a shadowy world of crime. It was also home to Huo Sang and Bao Lang, fictional Chinese counterparts to Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson and the creation of Cheng Xiaoqing, “The Grand Master: of twentieth-century Chinese detective fiction.” Timothy Wong’s translations of Cheng’s most popular works will introduce a kind of Chinese writing that will surprise many Western readers and shed much needed light on our picture of early modern Chinese fiction.

LC 2006015043, ISBN 978-0-8248-3034-2 (c.), ISBN 978-0-8248-3099-1 (p.)

AASL: not reviewed

PLA: S


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